PORCELAIN PLATES.NET
A Website for Porcelain License Plate Collectors & Enthusiasts
Texas Porcelains (H-Z)
HANSFORD

In the pre-state era, Hansford was the county seat of Hansford County, and thus
we cannot be entirely sure if the known "HANSFORD" tile represents the city or
the county.  The county is situated on the extreme northern end of the Texas
panhandle on the Oklahoma border and was sparsely populated, with only two
towns by the turn of the century.  Ranching was the mainstay of the county's
economy.  The city of Hansford had a population of 100 in 1915 at the height of
Texas' pre-state porcelain era.










HALLETTSVILLE

There are four communities in Texas that fit the known tile "H-VILLE."  However,
the best guess is that this tile represents the city of Hallettsville, the county seat
of Lavaca County in the Southeast portion of the state.  In 1887 the San Antonio
and Arkansas Pass Railway built through the town, and Hallettsville became the
principal trading center and shipping point for area farmers and ranchers.  By the
pre-state era, the city's population hovered around 1,500.  










HASKELL

Haskell is a county in North-Central Texas.  The county's population of rural
farmers grew to well over 2,500 in 1900.  Haskell is also the name of the county
seat.  As such, the city dominated regional trade and culture in the late 19th
century.  In the first decade of the 20th century, the railroad came to town and the
city was officially incorporated.  There is no way to tell is the known "HASKELL" tile
represents the city or the county.










HAYS

Unlike many Texas jurisdictions where there exists both a city and a county by the
same name, the known Hays tile leaves no room for mis-identification as it clearly
spells out "HAYS CO."  Hays County lies in South-Central Texas and is notable for
its many streams and springs.  After the railroads were built, the county prospered
and had a population near 15,000 by the time porcelain license plates appeared in
Texas.










HILL

Hill County is located in northern central Texas.  Carved out of Navarro County in
1853, the county had 3,653 inhabitants, including 650 slaves by 1860.  Hill County
benefited greatly from the coming of the railroad.  By September 1881, railroads
reached the county and within six years, connections to Dallas had been
completed.  By 1913 Hill County had 200 miles of rail lines.  In part because of the
railroads, the county population increased substantially.  Between 1881 and 1910
various towns developed along the railroads or expanded because of better rail
communications.  In 1910 the county reached a peak population of 46,760.  Cotton,
corn, wheat, and oats were the most important crops, and by the early decades of
the 1900s, cotton was raised on 60 percent or more of the cropland in use.  In 1916
Hill County was the fourth leading county in Texas in cotton production.  It was at
this moment of peak prosperity that porcelain license plates were being used on
vehicles in the county.










HOUSTON

A huge city in Southeastern Texas, Houston was founded in 1836, and its
livelihood depended on cotton and commerce.  The burgeoning port and railroad
industry, combined with oil discovery in 1901, put Houston on the map. After the
devastating 1900 hurricane in Galveston, efforts to make Houston into a viable
deep water port were accelerated, and in 1914, the Port of Houston opened for
business, making the city one of the largest deep water ports in the nation.  
Houston was also the rail center of Southeast Texas, further bolstering the city's
prominence in the region. The Texas pre-state era came and went right at the
height of this commercial development and just as the city's population was
reaching 100,000.










HUNT

Hunt County is located in northeastern Texas in the Blackland Prairie region of the
state.  The county remained rural and isolated until the turn of the century when
railroads finally crisscrossed the county, sparking the growth of towns and
providing farmers facilities for shipping their crops. In the pre-state era of the
early 20th century, the county's population hovered around 50,000.  There is also a
city named Hunt at the junction of the north and south forks of the Guadalupe
River in central Texas, but it seems unlikely that the known "HUNT" tile represents
this tiny town.










JUNCTION

The county seat of Kimble County, Junction is a city in central Texas at the
confluence of the North and South Llano rivers. Junction had a population of 800
in 1910, when automobiles were first making their appearance on city roads.










KENDALL

Kendall County is situated in south central Texas, 170 miles inland from the Gulf of
Mexico.  Farming, livestock and ranching were the county's principal industries in
the late 19th century.  The arrival of railroads further solidified the county's
commercial significance and by 1900 the population had surpassed 4,000.










LA GRANGE

La Grange is a city in Southeastern Texas on the Colorado River.  The city grew in
prominence as a trade center during the late 1800s, and although the town's
population was actually on the decline during the first two decades of the 1900s,
there were nevertheless close to 2,000 residents there in the Texas pre-state
license plate era.










LAMPASAS

Lampasas is the name of a county in central Texas and also the name of the county
seat.  The county was created in 1856 and the city was officially incorporated in
1883.  Known in the early days for its mineral springs, many settlers came to
Lampasas County for the purported healing qualities of the springs.  The region
grew slowly, but in 1872, the first passenger train arrived, linking Lampasas to
Galveston and thus forging a fundamentally important economic link for the
county.  In the boon years to follow, the city's population soared to over 10,000
residents.  By the dawn of the 20th century, Lampasas had lost some of its former
economic and commercial vibrancy, but remained stable with modest growth.











LAVACA

The county of Lavaca is located in Southeastern Texas.  By 1900, the county's
population was nearly 30,000, where it remained throughout the period in which
porcelain license plates would have been used.  At that time, the dairy industry,
swine raising and poultry production became leading industries in the county.  
Because the known "LAVACA" tile is used in conjunction with a Hallettsville tile
(the county seat of Lavaca), there is little doubt that this tile does in fact represent
Lavaca County and not the city of Port Lavaca near the Gulf Coast.










LLANO

Llano is the largest town and county seat of Llano County in central Texas.  The
discovery of iron fueled phenomenal growth for the county at the end of the 19th
century, and the population of the city of Llano had exceeded 7,000 by then.  
However, the boom period soon faded, and by the time of the Texas pre-states,
Llano relied on farming, ranching, and the granite industry as the foundations of
the town's economy.  Because both the county and the city are named Llano, it is
impossible to determine which jurisdiction the known "LLANO" tile represents.










LOCKHART

Lockhart is the county seat of Caldwell County, lying thirty miles southeast of
Austin in East-Central Texas.  By 1890 Lockhart was connected to the outside
world via the railroad and would soon become an important regional center for
processing cotton, with a cottonseed oil mill opening in 1893 and a compress in
1901.  By that time, the population had was more than 2,300, having more than
doubled from the figure just ten years prior.










MARLIN

Marlin is the county seat of Falls County and lies four miles east of the Brazos
River in East-Central Texas.  Incorporated in 1867, the discovery of hot mineral
water in the region put the city on the map, and Marlin geared its economy to the
health industry throughout the early 20th century when Texas pre-states would
have adorned vehicles in the city.











MARSHALL

Located in East Texas approximately thirty-nine miles west of Shreveport,
Louisiana, Marshall was one of the largest and wealthiest towns in East Texas in
the latter part of the 19th century.  It was a regional center of agriculture, cotton,
and education and was serviced by a network of railroads by the turn of the
century when the population surpassed 10,000.










McKINNEY

McKinney is the county seat of Collin County in Northeastern Texas not far from
the Oklahoma border.  Incorporated in the mid 19th century, McKinney served
until very recently as the principal commercial center for the county, providing
farmers with flour, corn, and cotton mills, banks, churches, schools, newspapers,
and other businesses including a textile mill, an ice company, a large dairy, and a
garment-manufacturing company. The arrivial of the railroad in the late 19th
century expanded the commercial enterprises of McKinney, and by the time the
Texas pre-states first started appearing on cars, the city's population was nearing
5,000.










MINEOLA

Lying eighty miles east of Dallas, Mineola lies in the heart of the East Texas timber
belt.  As a result, railroad tiemaking and lumber buoyed the town's prosperity
along with livestock and agricultural products.  By 1890, Mineola boasted a
population of 2,000.










NAVARRO

Navarro is a county in Eastern Texas in which the tiny town of Navarro Mills is
situated.  The "NAVARRO" tile likely represents the county, but this is open to
question.  By 1900, the county's population neared 45,000.  Livestock and oil, along
with numerous agricultural products, fueled Navarro's economy, which remained
strong throughout the pre-state license plate era.










NEW BOSTON

New Boston is a city in Bowie County in the extreme Northeastern part of Texas.  It
is situated about 20 miles West of Texarcana.  By 1900 the town had a population
of nearly 800, but grew slowly until after the pre-state license plate era was over.










NEW BRAUNFELS

New Braunfels is at the confluence of the Guadalupe and Comal rivers in central
Texas, not far from both Austin and San Antonio.  The city was the commercial and
manufacturing center of a growing agricultural area, and by 1850, this city of
German immigrants was the fourth largest in the state.  Further bolstered by the
arrival of freight and passenger trains, the population of New Braunfels was
greater than 3,000 when the porcelain Texas pre-states made their appearance.










NEW ULM

Founded in 1841, New Ulm is a small town in south central Texas located midway
between Austin and Houston.  The arrival of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas
railroad in 1892 stimulated the New Ulm economy, and the town shipped cotton,
poultry, eggs, and butter to markets in surrounding counties. In the era of the
Texas porcelains, New Ulm's population was around 300 or 400 residents.










OVALO

Ovalo is a small central Texas community on the Abilene and Southern Railway in
southeastern Taylor County.  Named the Spanish word meaning oval, the
oval-shaped valley was an early camping place for buffalo hunters and a stop for
trail drivers going through Buffalo Gap.  After the railroad came to town in 1909,
Ovalo's fortunes began to improve and within a year it was home to 46 businesses
and two churches.  By 1914 the town also had its own bank.  In the pre-state era,
the town's population would have been just shy of 300.










PANHANDLE

Panhandle is the county seat of Carson County, and lies centrally located in Texas'
northern Panhandle.  At the end of the 19th century, it was the terminus of the
Southern Kansas Railway, and an important cattle ranching region.  In the
pre-state era, the town's population had grown to surpass 600.  Although it seems
most likely that this tile represents the town, it is conceivable that an automobile
owner living in any one of the 26 counties comprising Texas' panhandle region
could have used this tile on their vehicle.










PLAINVIEW

The county seat of Hale County in Northwestern Texas, Plainview is located on a
cattle trail in an area of abundant water, good ranchland, and excellent soil.  When
the Pecos and Northern Texas Railway reached the town in 1906, the region saw
an agricultural boom and the population reached almost 3,000 by 1910.  Plainview
is also the name of a tiny town in Denton County, Texas, but it seems more likely
that the known "PLAINV.W" tile represents the community in Hale County.










ROSCOE

Originating in 1890, Roscoe was originally called Vista, for an official of the Texas
and Pacific Railway, which built through in 1881.  When citizens applied for a post
office in 1892, the name Roscoe replaced Vista.  Growth was stimulated in 1894,
when the rail flagstop of Katula, where cattle were penned for shipment, was
flooded and the switch line was moved one-half mile to Roscoe.  Incorporation
and the first city council meeting occurred in 1907.  A year later, construction
began on the Roscoe, Snyder and Pacific Railway, a fifty-mile line between Roscoe
and Fluvanna.  Serving as a bridge between the Santa Fe and Texas and Pacific
railroads, the RS&P became one of the most profitable short lines in the nation.










ROUND ROCK

In 1851 a small community was formed on the banks of Brushy Creek, near a large
round rock located in the middle of the creek. This round rock marked a
convenient low-water crossing for wagons, horses and cattle and would later
become part of the Chisholm Trail as cattle being marched from South Texas to
Abilene, Kansas crossed the river at Round Rock. Lying just north of Austin, there
were more than 1,000 residents in Round Rock in the era of the Texas porcelains.










SAN ANGELO

Located in central Texas, the nearby Fort Concho brought San Angelo a steady
flow of money from the soldiers' pay, which in turn brought traders, merchants,
and others who catered to the needs of the soldiers. Agriculture and cattle
ranching fueled the economy, and after the railroads came to town around the
turn of the century, it became a shipping center as well.  By 1920, the population
had swelled to more than 10,000.










SAN ANTONIO

There are two different porcelain tiles from Texas - one reading "S.A. TEX" and the
other "SAN A." - and although these could theoretically represent San Angelo or
San Augustine - I think the best guess is that these tiles were used to represent
the city of San Antonio.  In the mid 19th century, San Antonio was one of the most
important cities in Texas.  After the Civil War, San Antonio prospered as a cattle,
distribution, mercantile, and military center serving the border region and the
Southwest.  The arrival of railroads brought the city new economic growth, and by
the turn of the century, the population had surpassed 50,000 and the city had
become the most populous in all of Texas.  It remained the largest city throughout
the next two decades, boasting some 100,000 residents in the pre-state era.  A
Headline in the "San Antonio Light and Gazette" from March of 1910 heralded that
there were nearly 1,000 vehicles on the streets of the city by that time, including
about 200 unregistered motorists.


















SAN MARCOS

San Marcos, the county seat of Hays County, lies 25 miles south of Austin.  The
town began as the commercial center for trade between area farmers and
ranchers, as well as a center for ginning and milling local agricultural products.
But it was the arrival of the railroad that truly put the city on the map.  Cattle and
cotton production provided the basis for continued growth and by the time Texas'
pre-state era was over, San Marcos boasted nearly 4,000 residents.










SAN SABA

San Saba is the name of both a county in central Texas, as well as the city that
serves as its county seat.  The city of San Saba was founded on ranching and
agriculture in the mid 19th century, and developed rapidly as the political and
commercial center of San Saba County. Cattle drives, sheep ranching, and cotton
cultivation sustained the town's growth and by the 1890s San Saba had
established itself as a finance, processing, and marketing center for county
farmers and ranchers as well as merchants and craftsmen servicing settlers on
the expanding frontier. The local economy was further boosted when a branch line
of the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe Railway was built through the town in 1911.  The
population was around 1,200 in the pre-state era.  As for the county as a whole, the
population had surpassed 7,500 by the turn of the century and grew to more than
10,000 by 1920 with an economy based on livestock, farming, and the county's
famed peach and pecan harvests.  In a note perhaps interesting to license plate
collectors, the county's progress in the area of highway construction was a bit
slow. In fact, San Saba County was the last county in Texas to have its roads
paved.  It is unclear if the known "SAN SABA" tile was used by a motorist in the city
or the county.










SEGUIN

Lying on the Guadalupe River in central Texas, Seguin is situated about 35 miles
northeast of San Antonio.  The land is suited for agriculture and ranching and is
rich in oil and minerals. The economy of Seguin has generally been agricultural,
and In the late 18th century, residents grew cotton, corn and peanuts and raised
hogs and cattle.  The city's population reached X by X.










SEYMOUR

A smaller community in Northern Texas, Seymour benefited from a brief railroad
boom in 1890, followed by the discovery of oil in the region in 1906.  There were
probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 2,000 inhabitants in the county in the
pre-state era.










SHERMAN

Sherman is the name of both a city and a county in Texas, and it is not clear which
of these two jurisdictions the known "SHERMAN" tile represents.  The county is in
the High Plains region of the northern Panhandle on the Oklahoma border and was
a remote cattle ranching region with a population of about 1,500 during Texas'
pre-state license plate era.  The city of Sherman, on the other hand, is 75 miles
North of Dallas in Northeastern Texas and was an important commercial center and
produce market of more than 10,000 people by 1900.










SMITH

Located in Northeastern Texas, Smith County is home to the city of Tyler - the
largest city and county seat.   By 1860, the population reached over 13,000 with an
economy based mostly on cotton, livestock, corn and timber.  The Civil War and
Reconstruction left the county in shambles, but eventually prosperity would come
back to Smith County.  The coming of the railroads opened up small industries and
increased shipping lines.  With the turn of the century, Smith County took a new
agricultural direction and by1910, the county's population has swelled to over
40,000 with fruit trees pecans, tomatoes, cotton and roses being important to the
economy.










TAYLOR

Taylor is both the name of a central Texas county as well as a city in nearby
Williamson County.  The heavily agricultural county was organized in 1878 and is
the home of Abilene, the largest and most commercially important town in the
county.  As for the city, it was a busy shipping point for cattle, grain and cotton in
its early years.  When the railroad came to Taylor in 1882, the town was
incorporated and by the turn of the century, Taylor was a thriving place.  The
known Taylor porcelain tile could have been used by residents of either
jurisdiction.










TEMPLE

Founded in 1881 as a railroad town, Temple is situated in central Texas and was
one of the leading medical centers in the Southwest in the late 18th century.  
Because of its railroad interchange and its medical facilities, Temple became the
largest city in the county.  By 1900, there were already more than 7,000 residents
in the city.  











TERRELL

Terrell is a county in Southwest Texas on the Mexican border.  The county was
formed in 1905 and cattle and sheep ranching have dominated its economy since
the beginning. The population was somewhere around 15,000 during the pre-state
porcelain era. Terrell is also a city in Northeastern Texas which was a shipping
point for cattle, cotton and timber in the area around the turn of the century, and it
is unclear which of these two jurisdictions the known "TERRELL" tiles represent.  
In addition to the regular sized passenger plate, it is notable that a motorcycle
porcelain also exists with a "TERRELL" tile - one of only three jurisdiction tiles that
we have seen on Texas pre-state porcelains.












TEXAS

In addition to city and county tiles, state tiles reading "TEXAS" also existed.  
Interestingly, these tiles are known in two different widths - the only case other
than Corpus Christi in which any jurisdiction tile is known to have varied in size.  
The common "TEXAS" tile is the normal X" x X", but a rarer variant comes on a tile
the same size as the regular number tiles (X" x X").


















TRAVIS

Travis County lies in Central Texas, and has derived much of its prosperity over
the years from the Colorado River, which flows through Travis.  In 1890 the county
had over 36,000 residents, nearly 15,000 of which  lived in Austin.  Yet, in spite of
size and significance of Austin, the majority of the county's residents lived on
farms or in smaller towns, and agriculture dominated the area economy.  Cotton
became the principal field crop in the late 1880s and remained so throughout
Texas' pre-state era.










TROY

Located in East-Central Texas just North of Temple, Troy was a small community
that boasted about 500 residents by 1900.  Troy prospered as a shipping point for
cotton, livestock, and the other agricultural products of the region.  There is a
second town of Troy in the nearby Freestone county, and we are unsure which of
these towns the known "TROY" tiles represent.










TYLER

100 miles southeast of Dallas, Tyler is a city in East Texas.  In the latter part of the
18th century, Tyler's economy boomed due to the acquisition of railroads and
machine shops - although it was agriculture which was the mainstay of the city's
economy.  During the early twentieth century cotton, truck farming and fruit
orchards all played important roles in the city's economy, and by 1910, Tyler's
population had surpassed 10,000.  Tyler is also the name of an East Texas county,
and it is unclear if the known "TYLER" tile is from the city or the county.  
Interestingly, Tyler is one of only three jurisdictions in Texas from which
motorcycle plates are known.
















VERNON

Vernon is situated in northern Texas near the Oklahoma border.  After the railroad
came to town, Vernon was incorporated and by 1892 it had 3,500 residents.  The
only known Vernon plate is pictured below.  Note the unusual (but not unique)
placement of a zero before the plate number.  This is most likely due to an owner
purchasing a base longer than needed and filling the first slot with a zero as a
space filler.











VICTORIA

Victoria, centrally located in Southeastern Texas' Victoria County, is the
commercial focus of the surrounding counties.  The greatest initial period of
growth came right in the pre-state era.  In fact, the decade between 1910 and 1920
is the most critical time in Victoria's development.  During those years the county's
population increased nearly 22 percent, surpassing 18,000, while the city's
population rose by more than 60 percent to nearly 6,000.  It is unclear if the known
"V-TORIA" tile refers to the city or the county of Victoria.










WACO

Like most Texas towns, Waco suffered immeasurably from the Civil War.  However,
the town's economy recovered rapidly in the years just after the war, relying
heavily on a cattle-fueled economy.  The arrival of railroads soon made the city a
transportation hub, and by the 1890s Waco had become one of the most important
cotton markets in the south.  In 1900 Waco was the sixth largest population center
in Texas, and by the time Texas' pre-state license plate era was over, the city
boasted some 35,000 residents.  Interestingly, in 2013 the Waco plate pictured
below (#550) turned up and surprised collectors because of its distinctive serifed
lettering.  Of the hundreds of known Texas tiles - including known tiles from Waco
- this is the only example that deviates from all the others in terms of the style of
the lettering.
















WALNUT SPRINGS

Founded in 1861, Walnut Springs lies in North-Central Texas. The city became the
headquarters of the Texas Central Railroad divisional machine shops when the
railroad company built a line through the community in 1880-81, which remained in
operation throughout the pre-state era.  Originally named Walnut, the name was
changed to Walnut Springs in 1892.  A single "W-Springs" loose tile is known.










WELLINGTON

Wellington is the county seat of Collingsworth County in northern Texas.  The first
permanent buildings were built there in 1891.  In 1893 a permanent county
courthouse was completed and by 1893 Wellington had five businesses.  After
1900 the city began to grow, and cotton began to rival cattle economically.  
Business and population growth was further stimulated in 1910 when the Wichita
Falls and Northwestern Railway reached the town.  At that time the population was
600.  In December of 1910 Wellington was incorporated, and by 1916 a public water
system had been installed.










WEST

The porcelain Texas plates with "WEST" are interesting, because they could mean
one of two things.  Firstly, they could simply represent the Texas town of West,
which lies 80 miles south of Dallas in McLennan County.  The town's early growth
was due to the railroad, and by 1900 West had a population estimated to have
been as high as 2,000. Cotton and small grain production, along with cattle
ranching, were the area's chief occupations.  However, Texas collector and expert
Wayne Shafer points out that prior to 1924, the western geographic area of the
state was not yet split into counties.  It was just a large area of sparsely populated
land referred to generally as "West Texas."  Thus, the "WEST" porcelain tiles could
theoretically refer to any jurisdiction within this massive expanse of land.  Perhaps
there were porcelain plates with "WEST" tiles hanging from cars in both the city of
West and in the region of West Texas.  After all, the tile would have worked for
either one!










WICHITA FALLS

Officially incorporated in 1889, Wichita Falls lies in North-Central Texas.  By 1900,
numerous railroads made their way through the town, making it a transportation
and supply center for Northwest Texas and southern Oklahoma. The population
was well over 2,000 in Texas' pre-state era.  An article in the September 22, 1912
edition of the "Wichita Daily Times" stated that there were 287 automobiles
registered in Wichita Falls, including eight delivery trucks.  By March of 1914, the
"Wichita Weekly Times" announced that vehicle registrations had now surpassed
700.










WOOD

Lying in Northeastern Texas, Wood County was demarked from Van Zandt County
and organized in 1850.  Early settlers were largely slave-holding Southerners, who
set up a slave-based, cotton plantation economy in Wood County.  By 1860, nearly
20% of the county's population were slaves.  After the Civil War, the county
remained much as it was during the antebellum years - namely overwhelmingly
agricultural and rural.  During these fifty years, the population rose from fewer
than 7,000 to nearly 30,000 residents.  It was during this time of growth that
automobiles made their appearance, many of which likely sported porcelain
kit-plates with Wood County tiles.











YOAKUM

Lying in Southeast Texas, Yoakum rose to prominence when the railroads made
the town an important shipping center for Longhorn cattle in 1887.  Hundreds of
people from surrounding towns found employment in Yoakum's railroad shops.  By
1896, the city's population was 3,000 and before the pre-state license plate era
was over, this number had burgeoned to nearly 8,000.
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Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"
Undated
Passenger
White/Blue
Tile Size: X" x X"